If Jackson Pollock crocheted

Whenever I have a lot of ends to weave in on a project, I am reminded of Jackson Pollock. Noted for his abstract expressionist paintings which he created (both famously and infamously) by throwing paint onto canvas, the trailing and chaotic nature of “ends to be woven in” always makes me think of his work, and I tell myself, “If Jackson Pollock crocheted,” this piece would be done!

But alas, I am not Jackson Pollock, so when I had finished joining all of the seams for my washable and future “Crochetachella Purse” and turned it inside out, this is what awaited:

The interior of the Crochetachella Purse sporting an "If Jackson Pollock crocheted" look with ends to be woven in
A few ends to weave in

So I dutifully got out my bent-tipped yarn needle, weaving in here, weaving in there. Back and forth and up and down until they were all woven in.

Then, I got out my scissors and ever so carefully trimmed the ends.

Trimming the ends is a delicate process, and if you have a lot of them to trim, it can become somewhat mindless, and that, in turn, can lead to crochet tragedy wherein you find yourself trimming not only the end you wove in, but some integral part of the finished crochet piece.

But, fortunately, I didn’t make any mistakes like that, and the interior of the purse was transformed:

One side of the interior of the crochetachella purse with the ends woven in and trimmed

One side of the interior of the crochetachella purse with the ends woven in and trimmed

With the body of the purse completed, I could have spent sometime stewing about what I would do for straps, but I decided the energy would be better used completing the pieces I need for red and gray crochet Viking hat for a baby:

A red and gray crochet Viking helmet for a baby

along with the pieces for the gray and red crochet Viking hat for a baby:

A gray and red crochet Viking helmet for a baby

Which–with the pieces to be attached and ends to be woven in– puts me right back where I started when I was thinking about “If Jackson Pollock crocheted.”