A crocheter’s work is never done

My concerns about running out of crochet remnants to be rehabbed were premature, and I am learning — as if I didn’t know — that a crocheter’s work is never done.

This shouldn’t be news to me, but as I sorted through the two boxes that had been home to a number of remnants that I worked my way though, I naively thought it was possible that there was an end to the remnants, and it was with some nostalgia that I worked on turning these twelve crochet remnants:

A dozen new crochet remnants ready for rehab
A dozen new crochet remnants ready for rehab

into these twelve crochet squares:

Twelve newly rehabbed crochet remnants
Twelve newly rehabbed crochet remnants

which I then stuffed into the small remaining bits of space in the nook:

The nook filled to the top with five-inch crochet squares
The nook filled to the top with five-inch crochet squares

And with those most recently completed squares fitted into the nook, I am deciding to call the nook “full,” and I am going to pack up the several hundred squares (which I will count as I pack) and put them into a box I will then ship to Connecticut.

Why Connecticut? you might ask.

Connecticut is the destination for these squares because last Christmas, I received a message at Ravelry from a fellow Raveler. He and his wife are active with Project Amigo, and one aspect of the project involves supplying the parents of Colima, Mexico, with crochet and knitted squares that can be assembled into blankets.

He had noted in my “about me” section of Ravelry, I said that I liked to make afghans, and he asked if I might be willing to donate some squares to Project Amigo. The blanket making is a component of the project’s larger purpose of providing young people of Colima an education, and ┬áparticipating in Project Amigo allows me to repurpose crochet remnants that would otherwise languish, honor my grandmothers, and help other children achieve a dream that might otherwise be denied.

So the other day, when I thought it was possible I was nearing the ends of my crochet remnants, it was a sincere, and as it turns out, entirely unnecessary concern.

Today, after I had finished work on the previous twelve patch, I got into another bin of crochet that had been packed up in “the big move” last March, and I experienced a mixture of horror and delight, I found these remnants:

An array of crochet remnants that demonstrate the truth that a crocheter's work is never done
An array of crochet remnants that demonstrate the truth that a crocheter’s work is never done

They were a mess, and I wasn’t quite sure how I would divide the pieces that needed dividing, but after a couple of hours, I had it all sorted out, and it turned out that the remnants I had unearthed easily broke down into twenty-four future crochet squares:

The rehab of two dozen crochet remnants begins
The rehab of two dozen crochet remnants begins

I find it very empowering to be able to take various remnants of crochet projects and modify them to give them new life, and I will push forward to a thousand squares, one stitch at a time.